Saturday, February 6, 2010

H Is For . . . Hayworth or Hathaway?

Was British GQ trying to pay homage to Rita Hayworth in this cover photo of Anne Hathaway (below)?

If so, the designers might take note that they've removed her neck, which also deletes the sinuous line created when Ms. Hayworth raises her arms.  And, of course, Anne Hathaway's arms are scarily shaded.

The oddest area, though, is from chin to breast to shoulder.  It looks utterly unnatural.


Poor Ms. Hathaway is left with a stumpy, very un-Gilda silhouette, which is not only unflattering, but inaccurate.

10 comments:

s. said...

Even on her best day, Hathaway cannot stand up to Hayworth at her worst. And, no neck, weirdly distorted torso certainly does not a best day make...

Angie Muresan said...

That is totally freaky!

SOS! said...

i agree...inaccurate
xx-LJ from SOS!

Mardel said...

Although the pose does seem inspired by the Rita Hayworth phtograph, the result is disturbing and certainly not flattering.

Modern Traditionalist said...

Photoshop is the devil's tool. Even the best intentions result in something distorted, disembodied or simply disgusting.

Make Do Style said...

Love Gilda and the gorgeous sassy Hayworth. Truly a great film.
What is that pathetic cover about - Anne H looks a little freakish with a stumpy neck, they couldn't have been channelling Gilda.

WendyB said...

Cover fail.

enc said...

It sure seems like her head is way too big for her body, if you'll allow me to weigh in.

Alex said...

A photographic team, working at this top level, surely must have been aware of the channeling of Hayworth's iconic performance as Gilda, when styling this shot.

Hayworth's dress (and that film)already had traces of sado-masochism. But in her sly performance, she danced and laughed it off. Which helped the censors forgive the explicit film, and preserved Hayworth's class and charm.

Hathaway seems to know what's up, and is quite literal in her gaze. This photo is out of an S&M trade. And while it's a new way of seeing her, I miss her usually warm, magnetic self. Maybe if she were smiling???

Lydia, Clueless Crafter said...

It's a bit mannerist - lacking bone structure and elongated necks - only we don't get to see the actual elongation.

Instead, as you deftly notice, just a stump.

Miss Cavendish, it's rare I see a formal analysis of images from mass culture. I tip a hat to you, a gesture that requires one to have a neck;-)